Artist Profile - Mark Youd

Fragment XXII £795 43x33
Fragment XXVIII
Fragment XXVIII £795 43x33
Fragment XXII

Fragment XXII £795 43x33

Fragment XXVIII

Fragment XXVIII £795 43x33

Fragment XXII

Fragment XXII £795 43x33

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About Mark Youd
Artist Statement

Fragment XXII £795 43x33
Fragment XXVIII
Fragment XXVIII £795 43x33
Fragment XXII
Fragment XXII £795 43x33
Fragment XXVIII
Fragment XXVIII £795 43x33
Fragment XXII

Biography

Mark Youd is an artist working on the South Wales coast. Originally from North London he trained as a draughtsman and, in parallel to a successful career as a designer and technical illustrator, he has developed his personal artistic practice, challenging the traditional approach to portraiture and to painting itself. He has no formal qualifications and, aside from attending life-drawing groups, he has no art training beyond what he’s taught himself through practice and a keen interest in art history.In 2012 his work was chosen for an exhibition at the opening of Harveys Cellars, the home of Harveys Bristol Cream. Two solo exhibitions followed in 2016, including a successful show at Y Galeri Caerffili. His piece ‘Cast VIII’ was selected by Chris Orr RA for the 2016 ING Discerning Eye. Later in July 2017 his work was displayed at the Chelsea College of Arts in London as part of the FLUX exhibition. Two pieces, Fragment XXXI and Cast XXXIV, were selected for the Royal Birmingham Society of Artists (RBSA) 5th biennial Portrait Prize exhibition.


Artist Statement



My figures in the landscape have become figures
made of the landscape, inseparable from the earth.  I paint abstract portraits, not of
individuals, but of ancient artefacts or fossils, excavated after centuries,
merged with the rock and affected by the natural process of geology, erosion and
corrosion. . My restricted palette consists of earth colours such as: Burnt
Sienna, Venetian Red, and Yellow Ochre, which I use to recreate the tones of
rocks and metals. All these Ideas come from drawing; it’s the foundation upon
which my whole body of work sits. I draw the sitter and begin adding, or more
often, removing elements from the drawing. 
Manipulation of negative space, the area within and surrounding the subject
that describes its form is exciting to me. What I take away from a drawing is
often more important to me than what I leave behind. To pull that sensation off
the wall and walk around it is thrilling. Sculpture is the ultimate attempt to
make that revelation solid. Sculpting clay, for me, is very much like a free
form drawing. I rarely start with a preconceived end point in mind; rather, I
add and removed materials in search for the shape most exciting to me. By not
showing the whole face, by only suggesting certain features, by distorting it
through motion or by animating through the action of light, I am inviting the
viewer to participate in the portrait, to bring themselves into the work.